Edition 65 Archives - Think Outside the Tax Box

Edition 65

By Annette Nellen, CPA, CGMA, Esq.

Tax Rules and Due Diligence for Gambling

The vast range of taxable income and possible deductions and credits an individual may have for federal and state purposes creates a sizeable list of questions to ask clients annually. Regarding types of taxable income alone, the possible sources are almost too numerous to ask. So, is it enough for practitioners to ask for information reporting forms plus a general question about other sources of income? In 2021, the IRS expanded Schedule 1 (Form 1040), Additional Income and Adjustments to Income, changing line 8, “Other income. List type and amount” to lines 8a to 8p to highlight 16 specific types of “other income” with line 8z added for reporting any other income types.

One of the specific income types at line 8b is for gambling income. Possibly the detailing of the Form 1040 other income line starting in 2021 signals that the IRS wants self-filers to be aware of what is taxable and that tax preparers should ask clients more questions.

In addition to reviewing the tax rules for casual gamblers, two Tax Court bench opinions issued this year are to highlight recent gambling issues the IRS found. The opinions explored the tax gap from gambling activities along with its relevance to due diligence considerations for individuals and tax advisers.

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Tax Planning for Gig Workers

The gig economy has opened moneymaking avenues for taxpayers who otherwise might have trouble making ends meet. But hustling has a price: Gig jobs also ignite tax complications that many of those workers probably don’t know about. Learning about those obligations too late can cost gig workers back-tax penalties and interest. They can also result in those workers sabotaging their own tax situation and paying too much money to the government. What do gig workers need to know about their complicated tax situation?

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Client Alert

Avoid Surprise Tax Hits When Using a Corporation for Your Business

Many taxpayers use S corporations (governed by Subchapter S of the Internal Revenue Code) or C corporations (governed by Subchapter C of the Internal Revenue Code) to legally reduce income taxes, payroll taxes, and self-employment taxes for their business. However, without careful planning, a taxpayer may have a surprise tax bill from using a corporation for federal tax purposes. This article will tell you when these unexpected tax hits can happen and how the taxpayer can avoid them with proper planning.

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Is the Augusta Rule a Tax Haven or a Ticking Time Bomb? New Tax Court Memo Cautions Users

Sure, the Augusta Rule can be a game-changer for your finances—but only if you tread carefully. Get one element wrong—be it your business structure, purpose, or documentation—and you could be inviting the taxman to your doorstep. And don't even think about going it alone; if your tax pro isn't well-versed in this complex write-off, you're essentially rolling the dice on an audit nightmare. The Augusta Rule has lately become the talk of the town on TikTok's tax scene, capturing the attention of both amateur bloggers and seasoned tax experts. In this article, we'll demystify what the Augusta Rule really entails, identify who stands to benefit from it, explore legal ways to leverage it, and highlight potential risks you should be aware of. First, let's delve into its fundamentals. Read on to find out how to navigate this high-stakes tax strategy without detonating your financial future.

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Why Tax Planners are Turning to ELI5 – The Results Will Amaze You!

Taxes can be a maze of numbers and jargon that leave even the savviest individuals scratching their heads. But what if there was a secret method that tax professionals were using to make it all seem as easy as child's play? Introducing the ELI5 approach!

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