Loopholes Archives - Think Outside the Tax Box

Loopholes

By Dominique Molina, CPA MST CTS

How to Get More Tax Benefit from a Fully Depreciated Property

Question: I have a fully depreciated rental property that I purchased more than 40 years ago. What are some tax planning strategies I should consider?

Answer: Congratulations! You defied the odds and the thousands of advertisements claiming that real estate investing is an easy way to get rich. But now that your precious “paper losses” a.k.a. depreciation is long gone, it’s time to search for a new way to create tax advantaged income.

There are some fun ways to “re-depreciate” your investment again, and even put some of those carryovers to use. But before jumping into tax, let’s also consider your investment returns since you achieved this milestone.

One issue I see many real estate investors face is that they tend to be short-sighted with their goals. You might, initially, have a goal to get rental income sufficient to cover your mortgage payments. You might have a longer-term goal of eventually having rental income pay off your mortgage. Often, when either of these events occur, I notice some investors sit back to enjoy their success.

While success specifically means something different for everyone, from a wealth and tax perspective it is important to also evaluate your choices and returns on your investment.

Examining the cash-on-cash return on investment is especially important for real estate investors who may not consider more than their initial down payment as their own investment.

In addition, identifying loopholes which allow you to re-depreciate your property can also create significant tax benefits you cannot afford to miss.

Keep reading to learn more…

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2022 Summer Education Series Event Calendar

TOTTB proudly introduces our 2022 SUMMER EDUCATION SERIES! That’s right! Every month through August we will be bringing you a FREE, live webinar event to help educate and inspire you on all things tax! As a monthly or annual subscriber, these webinars are 100% exclusive, and free to you! Guest speakers include regular columnist, Peter Reilly, Boston Tax Institute Founder, Lucien Gauthier, the Tax Mama, Eva Rosenberg, and more! Every webinar comes with free continuing education credits for those who qualify! Keep reading for more details...

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How Do Community Property States Affect Tax Returns?

Question: How do community property states affect tax returns? Answer: While fairly easy to determine your filing status when married (either joint or separate), tax rules get more complicated when you live in a community property state. Generally, the state laws where you live govern whether you have community property and community income or separate property and separate income for federal tax purposes. Not only do these rules affect how much income is taxable to you, but they also impact rules in things such as deductions, credits, taxes and payments, basis for things like capital gains, and participation rules. In some states, the income you earn after you separate and before a final divorce decree continues to be community income. In other states, it is separate income. Under special rules, income that can otherwise be characterized as community income may not be treated as community income for federal income tax purposes in certain situations. This year particularly is important for evaluating whether or not to file separately if married, especially if there is a big difference in each spouse’s income. What may appear on the surface to qualify for stimulus and child tax credits, may, in fact, be disqualified once you report community property income. Click here to see if these disadvantages impact you and how to avoid them.

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Charlie Sheen’s Income Tax Woes – Things Are Looking Better

When it comes to celebrity gossip, Charlie Sheen, who I mainly remember as the star of Two and A Half Men, is in a class by himself. You could, for example, look up the Charlie Sheen Effect, if that sort of thing interests you. At any rate, given all his other issues, it is not shocking that he has tax troubles. The IRS has been trying to collect from him for the years 2015, 2017 and 2018. He recently got some good news from the Tax Court and there may be some lessons worth learning from his case. Based on the public record, we don’t know how much the IRS is trying to get from Charlie Sheen. It is reasonable to infer that it is considerably more than the $3.1 million offer in compromise that the CPA and United States Tax Court Practitioner Steven Jager negotiated for Sheen. We also don’t know whether any of what the IRS is looking for is the result of an audit or whether it is entirely the result of Mr. Sheen filing without paying. Continue reading to learn how to negotiate your tax debt like a celebrity.

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I Won! Now What? What Is the Tax Price of Success?

Lucky and talented folks win all sorts of prizes and awards. Often, the winnings have nothing to do with the winner’s business or profession, but sometimes there’s a professional or business connection. You might view your career arcs as a series of applications, interviews, hirings, promotions with one or multiple employers. But some career paths – musicians (both instrumental and vocal), songwriters, and composers come to mind – involve frequent auditions with a healthy dose of competition. The renown and visibility afforded to competition winners often open doors to career advancement – more and better engagements, management contracts, and media/recording opportunities. Competition prizes and awards are taxable. But these winnings might also be subject to self-employment tax that can be up to 15.3 percent on the taxable amount. While most professional musicians are in the business of being musicians, very few consider themselves in the business of being competition participants. The distinction is important and allows for tax planning and savings opportunities. To learn which is better for tax planning, keep reading.

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Client Alert

Can I Deduct My Dog?

Question: I’ve had clients ask and, of course, heard at cocktail parties the discussion about claiming a pet’s medical expenses and other costs. But what is the citation that prevents these deductions? Answer: Wouldn’t it be nice if you could get a little tax help from the government by deducting your dog? Aside from the enormous price breeders charge for designer pets, there are vet bills, food (some people even have their pets eat raw or vegan), obedience classes, clothing, exercise, and daycare to name a few! While today’s is a softball question, I thought we could all use a break from the continuation of the never-ending tax season of 2020. It also raises the issue of citations and documentation. Have you tried finding the one that says you cannot deduct pet expenses? What about the one that says you can? Keep reading to learn how.

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Segregating Activities Can Optimize Tax Savings for Professional Gamblers, Gamers, and Contestants

You’re tax professionals. You don’t need me to tell you that the money you are going to win in the virtual office pool on “the big game” is taxable income. You also don’t need me to tell you can’t net your winnings with the cost of the wager. You don’t, right? Most of the rules for reporting gambling income and deducting gambling losses for individuals are well understood with the possible exception of the session rules for slot machine play. I’m not going there—well, not in this article. This article is going to explore the nuances of tax optimization for people who have decided to go all in and turn their leisure time activities into a job.

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IRS Issues Hobby Loss Audit Technique Guide

2021 had been shaping up to be a pretty slow year in the hobby loss arena until September. Then not long after Labor Day we got a revision of the audit technique guide Activities Not Engaged in for Profit Audit Technique Guide Internal Revenue Code Section. The previous update was issued in June 2009. The two documents are nor radically different, but there are some things worth noting. I will start off with some background on Section 183, but first I will introduce you to a likely target of the revenue agents boning up on the new guide.

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Turning Services into Property Can Create a Non-recognition Event

It’s not often that we get to wave a magic wand and turn a taxable transaction into a non-taxable transaction, but partnership taxation offers us this opportunity. Partnership taxation is extraordinarily flexible and combines tax-favored aspects of both corporate entity taxation and individual taxation. Proper planning and use of this flexibility can actually turn a contribution in return for a partnership interest from a recognition event that results in taxable income to you to a non-recognition event that merely adds to your basis in the partnership. The difference between contributing services versus property for a partnership interest is huge. Contribute services, and you have taxable compensation. Contribute property, and you have a non-recognition event. Determining whether your contribution is classifiable as property rather than services saves a ton in tax. Keep reading to learn how.

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