Angie Bhasin, CPA CTP CTC MBA, Author at Think Outside the Tax Box

AUTHOR SPOTLIGHT

Angie Bhasin, CPA CTP CTC MBA

Angie Bhasin is a Certified Tax Planner/Coach and a Certified Public Accountant. She is the recipient of the prestigious Certified Tax Planner of the Year Award-2020, bestowed by the American Institute of Certified Tax Planners.

Angie graduated with Baccalaureate in Commerce from India (Magna Cum Laude) and Masters in Business Administration from US International University, San Diego (Summa Cum Laude). She spends considerate time and effort each other staying abreast of all tax law changes in order to provide state-of-the-art service to her clients and also educate other professionals.

Angie is the founder of premier, industry-leading 100% virtual advisory firm that provides proactive tax planning solutions and customized tax strategies for busy executives and high net worth individuals all over the country. She offers a high level of personalized service making it easier for her clients to understand their current situation and what is required in order to gain more control over their finances, lower their tax liabilities, increase cash inflow and build/grow wealth. She provides exceptional value to her clients by designing customized inventive and legal tax strategies for her clients pursuant, equipping them to live fruitful lives and leave lasting legacies for their families and beyond.

Angie is over-committed to the success of her clients.
While tax preparation provides a record of past data, tax planning uses a proactive approach to create opportunities to rescue thousands of dollars in wasted tax. Small businesses and individuals must be PROACTIVE about managing their taxes. Major corporations have access to such strategies through their tax/legal departments. Angie is very passionate about bringing this service within the reach of small business owners so they can put more of their hard-earned money back in their own pockets. Her experiences encompass helping her clients in the following industries: Self-Employed Healthcare Practitioners, Dentists and Dental practices, Real Estate Professionals and Investors, Restaurants, Information Technology, Manufacturing, Construction and other Service Industries.

Angie is extremely passionate about educating taxpayers about the significance of pro-active tax planning and tactics to increase profits, improve cash flow, and grow generational wealth. She is a professional speaker, frequently presenting at Conferences and Mastermind Meetings sharing tax savings strategies with the audiences in order to educate them to STOP DONATING to the IRS. Her excellent credentials, professionalism, and affable personality allow her to provide expert advice on tax issues to thousands of taxpayers.

She lives in California with her family, an amazing husband and two beautiful daughters. She is a foodie and love to go for long walks, listening to her favorite podcasts on taxes, quite a tax nerd!

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Conservation Easements – Is This Winning?

Looking for lucrative deductions to reduce your taxable income? Many people are turning to Conservation Land Easements (CE), and the tax authorities are doing their best to deny these deductions.

When a property meets the IRS criteria for a conservation easement, the owner may qualify to deduct thousands of dollars simply by acquiring the right kind of land an LLC holds.
Often, these deductions are worth much more than the actual cost of getting the LLC interest. Sounds appealing doesn’t it?

Under a conservation easement, a property’s owner gives up the right to make certain changes to that property to preserve it for future generations. Such an easement usually limits the usefulness of the property and lowers its value. But the tax deduction is not based just on the property’s reduction in value.

The magnitude of the deduction comes into play when the deduction’s value is calculated by taking the difference between the appraised “highest and best use” of the property and its new reduced value. These best use appraisals often make assumptions about the property’s potential creating massive tax deductions, which, of course, leave taxpayers lining up to claim.

But be careful! The IRS is cracking down on what it calls an “abusive tax deduction”; even going so far as to list the strategy on its Dirty Dozen list of tax scams.

Yet even after spending billions of dollars, the service is not having much success. In fact, it’s losing key arguments on the strategy. Continue reading to learn how to participate safely.

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CURRENT EDITION

Interview with Michael Kitces

Video Interview with Michael Kitces: Opening the Back Door to the ROTH IRA

Back in the spring of 2021 Editor-in-Chief, Dominique Molina, sat down with Michael Kitces from Kitces.com to discuss creative ways to use the ROTH IRA when developing tax planning strategies. This exclusive video interview is jam-packed with a variety of recommendations and suggestions highlighting the flexibility you gain in your planning when including the ROTH IRA as a tool! Sit back, relax, and enjoy the show!

Split Dollar Life Insurance

Using Split-dollar Life Insurance as a Tax Loophole

I’m no fan of needlessly complicating people’s tax situations, and I often remind readers to consider administrative overhead and compliance costs in addition to tax savings when evaluating tax strategies. The following strategies work best for high-net-worth taxpayers and medium to large “small businesses.”

I’m not talking about people who think they are high-net-worth, but if even after the estate tax exemption was doubled, you have to file an estate tax return (Form 706), this is you. If your individual or business net worth is in or is approaching the double-digit millions, this may not apply to you – yet. Keep reading anyway because it may be only a matter of time before you can use it or one of your “I wanna be a playa” clients comes to you asking about this strategy because they saw it on TikTok.

Keep reading to learn more on how to save.

Joint vs Separate New Advantages

Joint vs. Separate Filing – New Advantages with the 2021 Stimulus

COVID-19 has affected every aspect of our lives, and tax filing status is no exception. Couples who have filed jointly for their entire marriage may find that for 2021 it is more beneficial to file separately. This is in large part thanks to the many stimulus bills the Congress passed in 2020 and 2021.

The addition of Economic Impact Payments (EIP) and the associated Recovery Rebate Credits (RRC) have complicated what was once a simple tax calculation to now include these additional factors. In some scenarios, a couple would pay more tax filing separately than if they filed jointly, but because of pandemic-related credits, end up with more money in their pockets. Filing separately is not without its own potential headaches, though. Keep reading to find out when to switch your filing status.

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  • Avoiding Passive Loss Limitations Through Short-term and Alternative Rentals

    Short-term rentals like AirBnb are becoming increasingly popular with taxpayers who invest in real estate. For many taxpayers, the appeal of these properties is the flexibility and cash flow potential. However, there may be an overlooked third tax benefit. In many situations these short-term rentals may not qualify as a rental activity to the IRS, and that may offer a big tax break. While many rental activities generate losses, this can leave taxpayers facing the frustrations of not always getting to deduct those losses right away due to the passive activity limitations.

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    How Business Owners Can Boost Income by Avoiding the $10,000 SALT Cap

    Taxpayers have been whipsawed by confusing rules for the $10,000 limit on deducting state and local taxes (SALT), the most politically charged piece of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) of 2017. The cap has caused nearly 11 million individuals to lose an annual deduction worth $323 billion. But many owners of private businesses known as passthroughs can avert that financial pain. If you own your company and thus report your business income on your personal federal income tax return, here’s what you need to know.

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    GOFUNDME & KICKSTARTER: TAXABLE? DEDUCTIBLE?

    Millions of taxpayers in the United States are using crowdfunding websites like GoFundMe and Kickstarter to raise money for important needs, such as paying medical bills, paying legal fees, or funding a new business venture. Both the IRS and the courts have been surprisingly silent on the tax consequences of crowdfunding platforms. The good news is that established tax law provides a clear road map for answering most tax questions created by raising money from a crowdfunding website. By knowing these rules, taxpayers can use crowdfunding to raise cash and minimize their overall tax exposure.

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    My Client Stuck with a Mistaken C Corporation Election?

    My client formed three limited liability companies (LLCs) to hold his rental properties. Without consulting me, he filed Form 8832, Entity Classification Election, to elect C corporation treatment, effective January 1, 2020, for these LLCs. I want the LLCs to be disregarded entities, which is the most tax-efficient structure for his situation. What is the best way to undo these elections?

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    Quick Guide to Claiming Work-From-Home COVID-19 Expenses to Reduce Your Tax Bill

    This information is particularly important if you are the owner/shareholder of your own corporation – C or S corp. You can set up payroll and designate tax-free reimbursements for you to be working at home – as well other tax-free money for you and for your employees. (We will discuss employees momentarily. Yes, it’s essential.) If being an employee is your main source of income – watch out! The short answer to employees claiming an office in home deduction this year is... There is no deduction!

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    Five Tax Reduction Strategies for the Casual Cryptocurrency Owner

    With so many people looking for more ways to make money outside their 9 to 5 jobs, many are turning to money making methods using technology including trading in cryptocurrency. For tax purposes, the IRS considers cryptocurrencies property, not as currency. Just like other property types, stocks, investments, or real estate, when you sell, swap, or otherwise dispose of your cryptocurrency for more or less than you acquired it for, you incur a tax reporting obligation. As an example, there would be a $1,000 capital gain if 0.1 bitcoin is bought for $2,000 in June of 2020 and then sold for $3,000 two months later. This profit must be reported on the tax return and a certain amount of tax is due on the gain, depending on the tax bracket of the taxpayer. In this example, the gain would be short term requiring the profit to be taxed at the filer’s ordinary tax rate. These rates range anywhere from 0-37%.

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    Extra Taxes on S Corporation Distribution?

    My client plans to take about $15,000 in distributions in excess of his basis from his S corporation construction business. I know this generates tax for him. He’s in the 32 percent tax bracket and single. Does he also have to pay the 3.8 percent net investment income tax and the 0.9 percent additional Medicare tax on this amount? Is there a way for him to avoid taxes on this amount?

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    Reduce Taxable Income Up to $25,000 with Passive Rental Losses

    You have likely heard that owning rental real estate provides great tax benefits. This is true for a multitude of reasons, but there’s one benefit that is arguably the best of the bunch: The Small Taxpayer Allowance for Deducting Passive Rental Losses. Based on average household income levels, more than three-quarters of taxpayers can potentially qualify for this fantastic tax benefit that offers taxable income reduction of up to $25,000.

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