All Articles - Think Outside the Tax Box

CURRENT EDITION

By Keith Schroeder, EA

Buying Tax Credits: Inflation Reduction Act

Tax shelters offered high income taxpayers an easy way to reduce and even eliminate federal income taxes at the individual level. The growing tax avoidance schemes, many questionable in nature, threatened to collapse the U.S. tax system. Hence the need for tax reform and the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981 (ERTA). New rules cannot keep a tax professional down. Real estate was once again the favorite tool for reducing taxes. Enter cost segregation. Couple that with bonus depreciation and the automatic change of accounting method using Form 3115 , and you have a recipe for serious tax reduction. The tax shelters of the 1970s were often questionable. Cost segregation is still a valid way to accelerate deductions for income property owners. But none of that compares to the tax benefits available under the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 (the IRA).

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Don’t Overpay Tax on Crypto Forks and Airdrops

Practically overnight, cryptocurrency has gone mainstream, with more and more investors funneling money into Bitcoin, Dogecoin, and other cryptocurrencies. The IRS has responded with increased interest and scrutiny, demonstrated by the addition of the cryptocurrency question on the front page of 1040. Whether you have invested in cryptocurrency or not, you are required to answer this tax return question. Many investors choose to take the most conservative position to avoid future correspondence from the IRS but trying to avoid a letter is no reason to pay more tax than necessary! After all, the Supreme Court has long held that a taxpayer has the right to do everything possible under the law to reduce tax.

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Moving to a Low Tax State

Looking to escape high state taxes? Perhaps the taxpayer wants to leave the gridlock, housing congestion, and cement jungles behind for the likes of slower, less expensive living? COVID-19’s long-term impact on urbanization may be uncertain, but we have already seen people moving to low-tax states because these states offer more land and outdoor space. Along with the people, many businesses are also looking to relocate to low tax jurisdictions. But before packing up that U-haul, consider how to lock in your tax savings; otherwise, there may be a nasty bill waiting for you in that new mailbox.

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Go the Extra (Tax) Mile

Question: Can my business still take a deduction for my car if the title is in my name? Answer: If you want to get all the business deductions you are entitled to for your car, it’s better to have the vehicle titled in your business’s name. Most taxpayers continue to use their vehicles for both personal use and business purposes, as a result, most car titles show just the individual’s name as the owner. This can present a big problem and potential lost deductions, especially due to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA). It is important to review the rules since they have changed recently. You may have deducted expenses on past tax returns as an unreimbursed employee vehicle expense. But under tax reform, the miscellaneous itemized deductions were repealed until 2026, and this is an important rule change. Read on to learn how to still benefit after tax reform and why it can help you go the extra tax mile to title the car in your business’s name.

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Is Your Spouse Innocent or Injured? Part One: The Injured Spouse

Jack and Jill went up the hill to have a lovely wedding Jack fell down and broke his crown When Jill learned all his tax debts That pretty much describes the origin of the taxes faced by an injured spouse: The taxpayer was not married to that spouse at the time he or she incurred the tax obligation or it was assessed or did not sign the tax return where the balance due originated. In other words, it was never the injured spouse’s debt or obligation in the first place. What kinds of debts or taxes might the IRS collect (or “offset”) that would affect the injured spouse’s refund?

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Avoiding the Repayment Cliff: Mitigating the Effects of Miscalculating the Advance Premium Tax Credit

The premium tax credit (PTC) is a refundable credit that is available to certain individuals “whose household income for the taxable year equals or exceeds 100%, but does not exceed 400% of an amount equal to the poverty line for a family of the size involved.” In other words, it’s a refundable tax credit that specifically subsidizes the cost of insurance purchased on a health care marketplace for individuals who are over the federal poverty level (FPL), but not by 400 percent or more. This credit is available as an advance paid directly to the marketplace for qualifying taxpayers who cannot afford (or do not wish) to pay their full monthly premium out of pocket. The amount of the credit is calculated based on estimated annual household income. When taxpayers receive more advance credit than they are entitled to, they must repay the excess. So, the consequences for an intentional or inadvertent underestimation of annual income can be severe. What follows is an overview of how the credit works and describes strategies for reducing the amount of advance premium tax credit (APTC) the taxpayer must repay both immediately and after the fact.

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Coronavirus Tax Credits – How the Self-Employed Can Benefit

March 18, 2020, was a big day for tax bonuses. Congress passed the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). The bad news is this bill requires certain employers to provide two weeks of paid leave to employees impacted by COVID-19. The good news is that when you provide it to your employees, you get a juicy tax credit to reimburse you for these benefits. If you’re self-employed, you may have noticed you tend to miss out on certain tax benefits designed for companies with employees. But in the case of FFCRA, these credits are also available when you are your own boss. Continue reading to find out how to get this cash as soon as the end of the current quarter.

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How Late Is Too Late to Request a Late S Election?

Question: How Late Is Too Late to Request a Late S Election? Answer: Late in 2020, the IRS issued a Private Letter Ruling related to a late S election request for relief. Generally, you must file a request to become an S corporation no later than the 15th day of the third month of the taxable year for which the election is to take effect. If you miss this deadline, or don’t file an election at all, the business is generally considered a C corporation or LLC. If you’re like most business owners, however, you may not have known at the time you formed your business all the tax benefits available to you by holding your business as an S corporation. Whether you were unaware, or for some other reason, it may be well past the official IRS deadline to make this request for the current or recently ended tax year. If you haven’t yet filed your tax returns at all, you may be qualified to use the relief available by following the proper procedures. You may also wonder, “How far back can I go in changing the way my business income is taxed?” To learn more about how far back and how long you can be “fashionably late,” continue reading.

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Monetized Installment Sale – Risky Business

The monetized installment sale (MIS), which is more of a product than a tax concept sounds very attractive. In the right circumstances MIS promises a very long deferral of capital gains tax for a reasonable cost. But does the strategy actually work?

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