Joshua Youngblood, Author at Think Outside the Tax Box

AUTHOR SPOTLIGHT

Joshua Youngblood

Josh is the founder of The Youngblood Group. Josh works with individuals and small business taxpayers: he is a Certified Tax Resolution Specialist (CTRS), a Certified Real Estate Tax Strategist (CRETS), and a National Tax Practice Institute (NTPI) Fellow. With a keen interest in quality continuing education, both as a learner and an educator, Josh has conducted tax courses with topics ranging from BOI reporting to data security.
In addition, combining his 20 years of IT experience with his love of all things tech and tax, Josh currently enjoys writing and teaching about the responsible use of tech in the tax and accounting industry.
Active in the tax community, Josh serves as Vice Chair of the Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion committee of the NAEA and is a member of ASTPS, NATP, and the North Texas LGBT Chamber of Commerce. Beyond work, he enjoys family time and traveling.

READ MORE BY Joshua Youngblood

An Update on BOI Reporting

Misinformation, misinterpretations, and catastrophizing – much has been written these past few months about BOI (Beneficial Ownership Information), all coming from a range of voices, from tax professionals to politicians. There have been dire predictions of small business owners being ushered to jail for failing to file and fears of tax professionals rounded up for the unauthorized practice of law (UPL). Then there are those who mistakenly say BOI has been ruled unconstitutional and who reject any need to worry about it. That is profoundly wrong. Let’s look at the facts and put an end to all of this fearmongering.

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CURRENT EDITION

Intentionally Filing a Defective Tax Return

Creativity on a tax return is a natural tendency. Many strategies and behaviors we know are wrong, e.g. not reporting all income. However, is it ever okay to disregard some deductions and pay more tax? At first glance, it would seem that the IRS should like the idea of more reported income and a higher tax liability attached to the additional income. The IRS does not.

Side Hustles and Tax Tussles: Tax in the Gig and Share Economy Part Two

The gig economy involves more than one-off and part-time jobs. It also includes when you share your property in exchange for money. This can be a residential property, a vacation home, or even a vehicle. The gig economy has connected those who need rides and places to stay with owners via online platforms. We refer to this part of the gig economy as the share economy.

Accessing these accommodations is easy with the online platforms. But how the people participating should report their income isn’t quite as straightforward. Last time we looked at how your clients should report gig income, just like any other income made as a sole proprietor.

But making money from renting your property out is different, right? If you have clients with rental properties, you report their income on Schedule E (1040), Supplemental Income and Loss. We know from last time that we report gig economy income on Schedule C (1040), Profit or Loss from Business. So, how does rental income derived from the share economy get reported on a tax return? Every taxpayer’s favorite answer, it depends.

Loose Change in Your Couch and Maybe a Tax Break at Your Kitchen Table

A 2023 Tax Court decision upheld what many small business owners and tax practitioners have wondered about for some time. The court found that shareholders of an S corporation could exclude rental income paid to them by their S corporation for holding planning meetings in their homes. While the IRS and court found that the amounts charged by the shareholders were excessive, the court found the arrangement itself within the bounds of the law.
This article examines this case and underlying law and when and how this is a planning idea worth pursuing, the limitations and unknowns involved, and the policy implications of this long standing exclusion. The case is Sinopoli, TC Memo 2023-105 involving the exclusion at IRC Section 280A(g).

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  • Avoiding Passive Loss Limitations Through Short-term and Alternative Rentals

    Short-term rentals like AirBnb are becoming increasingly popular with taxpayers who invest in real estate. For many taxpayers, the appeal of these properties is the flexibility and cash flow potential. However, there may be an overlooked third tax benefit. In many situations these short-term rentals may not qualify as a rental activity to the IRS, and that may offer a big tax break. While many rental activities generate losses, this can leave taxpayers facing the frustrations of not always getting to deduct those losses right away due to the passive activity limitations.

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    How Business Owners Can Boost Income by Avoiding the $10,000 SALT Cap

    Taxpayers have been whipsawed by confusing rules for the $10,000 limit on deducting state and local taxes (SALT), the most politically charged piece of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) of 2017. The cap has caused nearly 11 million individuals to lose an annual deduction worth $323 billion. But many owners of private businesses known as passthroughs can avert that financial pain. If you own your company and thus report your business income on your personal federal income tax return, here’s what you need to know.

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    GOFUNDME & KICKSTARTER: TAXABLE? DEDUCTIBLE?

    Millions of taxpayers in the United States are using crowdfunding websites like GoFundMe and Kickstarter to raise money for important needs, such as paying medical bills, paying legal fees, or funding a new business venture. Both the IRS and the courts have been surprisingly silent on the tax consequences of crowdfunding platforms. The good news is that established tax law provides a clear road map for answering most tax questions created by raising money from a crowdfunding website. By knowing these rules, taxpayers can use crowdfunding to raise cash and minimize their overall tax exposure.

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    My Client Stuck with a Mistaken C Corporation Election?

    My client formed three limited liability companies (LLCs) to hold his rental properties. Without consulting me, he filed Form 8832, Entity Classification Election, to elect C corporation treatment, effective January 1, 2020, for these LLCs. I want the LLCs to be disregarded entities, which is the most tax-efficient structure for his situation. What is the best way to undo these elections?

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    Quick Guide to Claiming Work-From-Home COVID-19 Expenses to Reduce Your Tax Bill

    This information is particularly important if you are the owner/shareholder of your own corporation – C or S corp. You can set up payroll and designate tax-free reimbursements for you to be working at home – as well other tax-free money for you and for your employees. (We will discuss employees momentarily. Yes, it’s essential.) If being an employee is your main source of income – watch out! The short answer to employees claiming an office in home deduction this year is... There is no deduction!

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    Five Tax Reduction Strategies for the Casual Cryptocurrency Owner

    With so many people looking for more ways to make money outside their 9 to 5 jobs, many are turning to money making methods using technology including trading in cryptocurrency. For tax purposes, the IRS considers cryptocurrencies property, not as currency. Just like other property types, stocks, investments, or real estate, when you sell, swap, or otherwise dispose of your cryptocurrency for more or less than you acquired it for, you incur a tax reporting obligation. As an example, there would be a $1,000 capital gain if 0.1 bitcoin is bought for $2,000 in June of 2020 and then sold for $3,000 two months later. This profit must be reported on the tax return and a certain amount of tax is due on the gain, depending on the tax bracket of the taxpayer. In this example, the gain would be short term requiring the profit to be taxed at the filer’s ordinary tax rate. These rates range anywhere from 0-37%.

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    Extra Taxes on S Corporation Distribution?

    My client plans to take about $15,000 in distributions in excess of his basis from his S corporation construction business. I know this generates tax for him. He’s in the 32 percent tax bracket and single. Does he also have to pay the 3.8 percent net investment income tax and the 0.9 percent additional Medicare tax on this amount? Is there a way for him to avoid taxes on this amount?

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    Reduce Taxable Income Up to $25,000 with Passive Rental Losses

    You have likely heard that owning rental real estate provides great tax benefits. This is true for a multitude of reasons, but there’s one benefit that is arguably the best of the bunch: The Small Taxpayer Allowance for Deducting Passive Rental Losses. Based on average household income levels, more than three-quarters of taxpayers can potentially qualify for this fantastic tax benefit that offers taxable income reduction of up to $25,000.

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