All Articles - Think Outside the Tax Box

CURRENT EDITION

By Annette Nellen, CPA, CGMA, Esq.

Inflation Reduction Act 2022 Energy Tax Incentive Considerations

The Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 (P.L. 117-169; 8/16/22) could easily have been named the Energy Incentives Act of 2022. Over 20 provisions in the Act provide tax credits or special deductions to encourage the production and use of clean energy. The cost of these energy provisions over ten years is about $271 billion. In contrast, the ten-year revenue projection for the corporate AMT and one percent excise tax on certain stock buybacks is about $296 billion.

Most of the energy credits are for businesses and are specialized such as for the production of clean hydrogen or sustainable aviation fuel or zero-emission nuclear power production. Four credits are designed for individuals including three revised credits and one entirely new one (§25E, Previously-owned clean vehicle credit).

This article highlights key aspects of the credits and special energy provisions as a whole, offers tips for dealing with the complexities that exist in these IRA 2022 rules, and provides suggestions to help individuals obtain the greatest tax savings from the new and revised energy credits and rebates. A few charts are included to aid in understanding these credits.

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How Business Owners Can Boost Income by Avoiding the $10,000 SALT Cap

Taxpayers have been whipsawed by confusing rules for the $10,000 limit on deducting state and local taxes (SALT), the most politically charged piece of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) of 2017. The cap has caused nearly 11 million individuals to lose an annual deduction worth $323 billion. But many owners of private businesses known as passthroughs can avert that financial pain. If you own your company and thus report your business income on your personal federal income tax return, here’s what you need to know.

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Avoiding Passive Loss Limitations Through Short-term and Alternative Rentals

Short-term rentals like AirBnb are becoming increasingly popular with taxpayers who invest in real estate. For many taxpayers, the appeal of these properties is the flexibility and cash flow potential. However, there may be an overlooked third tax benefit. In many situations these short-term rentals may not qualify as a rental activity to the IRS, and that may offer a big tax break. While many rental activities generate losses, this can leave taxpayers facing the frustrations of not always getting to deduct those losses right away due to the passive activity limitations.

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